A 135mm equivalent angle of view

Today I was in the mood for something a bit longer than usual. When I started with analog film photography, I had lenses with 28, 50, and 135mm, and I wanted to see and to get a feeling for the latter again.

On Four Thirds and Micro Four Thirds cameras, you have sensors with roughly a quarter of the area of film, which means they have a so-called “crop factor” of two. So as a substitute for my 135mm film-aera lens, I had to use something around 67.5mm to get an almost similar angle of view (beside the differences in formats; (Micro) Four Thirds has a 4:3 format, while 24x36mm film was of course 3:2).

The only lens I have in that focal range is my Zuiko Digital 40-150mm zoom lens, so I decided to use that one today, first on the Olympus E-520 DSLR, and later with a cheap Viltrox autofocus adapter on my E-PL5 “Pen”-type camera. So here are some photos I took with that lens today:

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Toys on Arno’s monitor. E-520 with the lens at 64mm.

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Through the roof of Arno’s car. E-520 with the lens at 64mm.

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Soup. E-520 with the lens at 67mm.

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Corpse. E-PL5 with the lens at 70mm.

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Zuleikha. E-PL5 with the lens at 67mm.

Differences? Well yes. First, the lens was made for the phase detection autofocus of the DSLR. Which means it’s lots faster on it, but not as precise as on the Pen which uses a contrast-based autofocus technique. Second, it’s sharper on the “Pen”, not only because that one has more megapixels (16 instead of 10), but also because it has a much thinner or almost non-existent anti-aliasing filter in front of its sensor. And another part of the reason for the higher sharpness is the contrast-based autofocus – I said already that it’s more precise than fast.

As part of my DSLR double zoom kit, this lens was and still is an absolute bargain, and as such an easy recommendation. If you have – or plan to get – a Micro Four Thirds camera, there’s also an M.Zuiko version of it today, and some dealers offer these as a rip-off from double zoom kits from around 150€ or so, which is still a very nice proposition.

If – like me – you have a Micro Four Thirds camera and like faster lenses or even fixed focal length lenses, you have several other options in that focal range:

– the Panasonic 35-100mm/2.8 zoom is one of them. Costly, but very very good. And Olympus is planning to release something similar, even with a tripod collar if I remember correctly
– the cheapest fixed focal “prime” lens option with autofocus would be the Sigma 60mm/2.8 “Art” lens, of which I keep reading only the best comments. Very nice portrait lens or general short tele for not too much money (around 200€ or so)
– then there is the probably most versatile one: the Olympus 60mm/2.8 Macro. Maybe three times the price of that Sigma, but if you want or need a macro lens, it’s worth every penny of it. Comparable with my Zuiko 50mm/2 macro, which says a lot.
– and last not least one of the kings or poster childs of Micro Four Thirds: the awesome Olympus M.Zuiko 75mm/1.8 – probably the best lens of the whole system so far. Costs about as much as the Panasonic (or Olympus) zoom, but if you really want to “melt” away the background of portraits with Micro Four Thirds, you don’t really have any better option. For even shallower depth of field, you would need one of the old, heavy, and super expensive Zuiko Pro Grade lenses with aperture 2, which are still available bust cost north of 2000€. Or you’d need a real 135mm/2 on a “full frame” camera. The cheapest of these would be a Canon 135mm/2 which is offered starting slightly under 1000€ (like the 75/1.8 from Olympus). See this or this photo from Elena – or more from her impressive collection – to get the idea.

Thanks for reading.

Me, by Sebastian Schoen

me, by Sebastian Schoen
me, by Sebastian Schoen
Got my image taken last Tuesday by another fellow photographer. His name is Sebastian Schön (you can write German Umlauts using the original vocal followed by an ‘e’ if you don’t have that on your keyboard, so in this case, ‘Sebastian Schoen’ would be ok as well).

He has an impressive collection of portraits and made some book already, and you can also see some of his work at a big local magazine called “Stern” (=star). He was published in their Stern View Spotlight No. 81, from page 29. See more photos from Sebastian there.

He made this photo of me using his Nikon D800 with what looked like a Nikkor 85mm/1.8G lens – didn’t look that close.

Thanks Sebastian – cannot wait to see more of your great portraits!

Easter Sunday and Monday

Easter was quiet & easy this year, at least for us. We had thought about visiting my dad, but he didn’t feel too well and asked us to rather come another time. So yesterday we were invited for a barbecue in the garden of some friends, where I took these two:

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Easter eggs

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Tic tac toe

And today we’ve followed a tip of one of our neighbours and went to Gernsheim, which is some 20km south of Gross-Gerau in the direction of Mannheim. Here are three photos from this short trip:

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River Rhine at Gernsheim

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Not the bridge of Avignon – we can do the same…

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Ferry over the Rhine, in Gernsheim

The two photos from yesterday were taken with the Olympus 45mm/1.8 lens, the three from today with the PanaLeica 25mm/1.4 and a polarizer.

Thanks for viewing.