Robin Vincent about how to build an audio PC

Just found this awesome series from Robin Vincent about how to build an audio PC. It’s a bit over 2.5 years old, so when he’s talking about chipsets etc. it’s not that current anymore, but the principle is just right – and because I think that some of my friends over at Wikiloops would possibly be thankful for such explanations, here it is:

How to build an Audio PC
Molten Music Technology
1/7

Of course I would install Linux instead – or Windows *and* Linux – or Windows and *two* instances of Linux, which is what I did with my own machine. But that’s not part of what he’s talking about here, and I found his series really interesting. So thanks to Robin, and I hope that some of you who read this might find it useful as well.

As always, thanks for reading, viewing, and/or listening.

Sound setups

The more I’m using my new Debian 11 “Bullseye”, the more I like it. The first – and big – change to something better is that thanks to Geoffrey Bennett, a friendly musician and developer there’s now a Linux driver for the Focusrite Scarlett 2nd and 3rd generation interfaces in the kernel versions 5.x – see his latest thread on Linuxmusicians about it. He’s even developing graphical tools to manage these audio interfaces, but hasn’t released anything public yet. Still they work great, and I can now switch inputs from line to instrument, or assign a -10dB pad with a simple mouse click for instance in qasmixer, which shows my interface like this:

qasmixer showing my Focusrite Scarlett 6i6 2nd generation interface

This is cool because now you won’t need any Windows- or Mac-only software just to change settings on your interface (only the smallest Focusrite interfaces have physical switches, and none comes with software for Linux).

I have also set up a new LADISH studio for the Sonarworks headphone correction in Cadence and Claudia, and Cadence bridges all of Alsa, Pulseaudio, and Jack nicely so that it all works together. The cabling for my self-built “systemwide” setup for Linux in Carla looks like this:

Carla showing my Sonarworks headphone correction sitting “systemwide” between the PulseAudio Jack Sink and the system

Of course, I also had to select the right inputs and outputs for Pulseaudio in their pavucontrol, which looks like this:

Pavucontrol in- and outputs set to Jack to make it all audible

And these settings also allow third party applications like SongRec to check if a song might be a cover of others – and if yes, it shows something like this:

testing some Wikiloops template on known “covers” or songs which sound alike (based on Shazam recognition)

All of this is very complex because the Linux sound systems are so many, from Alsa over Jack to Pulse, and so on. But it all works nicely now, better than ever I’d say.

On Arch Linux I have Pipewire which tries to replace all of the sound servers mentioned above, and that also works – tho I haven’t looked that deep into it, and it’s also not quite ready yet. But from what I have seen and heard so far, that one is also perfectly usable already, so no matter which system is up and running (except Windows), I could make some music.

Good times. I’m happy that my transition to newer operating systems worked so well. And so today I also wiped all partitions from my old 250GB system drive which will go and find a new home in my brother’s PC as soon as he has time to deal with that. I already made a Ventoy-based USB boot stick with these same systems on it (plus some others which he hasn’t seen yet) for him.

Ok, enough for today. And thanks for reading, as always.

You Play On

Just published a new album on Wikiloops, and here’s its front cover from Flickr:

you_play_on_front_cover
You Play On by wjl & friends, hear it on Wikiloops

Photo: “Photo of Woman Sitting on Chair”, Jorge Fakhouri Filho
https://www.pexels.com/photo/photo-of-woman-sitting-on-chair-2530717/

As always, thanks to my friends on Wikiloops, and to Richard & family. Thanks to you for listening, downloading, and so on… hope you’ll like it 🙂

Wikilonians Online Jam

Sharing a Youtube video from 2012 here:

wikilonians online jam

Like Dick & Mr. Baer said, you’re invited – and it’s free. Join us, it’s fun! 🙂

Wikiloops artwork…

After trying out the new and upcoming artwork for Debian 11 “Bullseye” on my desktop (see my last post), I downloaded the poster art for the last Wikiloops member’s meeting in 2018, and tried that – and so this is how my desktop looks right now:

some Wikiloops artwork

Fits, because first I’ve been there (which was great), and second I’m a bass player… 🙂 So thanks to Dick for providing this – and thanks to you for viewing/reading, as always.

Trance 28, from Andreas Weber

A former colleague who left the company already is on SoundCloud, so I hope I’ll hear from him from time to time. Two days ago for instance he published this one:

Trance 28, by Andreas Weber (on SoundCloud)

Nice to hear from him 🙂

In the winter of our lives

Just found this tiny little gold nugget from the end of 2015 in Wikiloops, from Ms Patty and Mr Paul:

Awesome. Thanks Patty & Paul – and thanks to you for listening.

Setting output levels in Ardour

Some fellow musician in Wikiloops asked about output levels of songs, and how to get these. I tried to answer it to my best knowledge, and also explained how *I* do this using Ardour. Since version 6.3 of Ardour there are two ways to export to a certain loudness level, and I hadn’t fully explained that before, so I did it now – and made a short howto video about it:

short loudness tutorial ardour6

In case that is useful, I’m glad that I could help. And as always, thanks for reading, and watching/listening.