A picture of me, taking a picture

During yesterday’s lunch break, Arno and I walked around the houses a bit. I had my camera with me, taking some photos, and he captured me doing it:

dav

This was taken with his mobile phone. And what I took is this:

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More photos of me, taken by Arno can be seen in his Google Photos folder.

Thanks for viewing.

Portraiture, naturally

Happy new year again, everyone.

I’ve been thinking about my (and others’) photography lately, and watched lots of videos, and read lots of other photographers’ blogs. I also looked at my own photos, and identified some favourite ones. Almost all of them are photos of family members (including “our” cat). And that reminded me of my original reasons to get better cameras since late 2009.

It’s this personal photography which is most important to me. Keeping memories about family, friends, colleagues, strangers, simply people I’ve met or with whom I live. Thinking about 2017, I’d say that I have everything I need gear-wise. Ok; I could use some more lights (and/or modifiers for them), or maybe some more lenses. But mostly I have what I need – a very nice and capable little camera with prime (single focal length) lenses, and a telephoto zoom should I need some more reach and/or the perspective you have with these.

So I started the new year with what I like the most: take some portraits, naturally. Like this one:

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Zuleikha, January 2017

A propos the title of this short article, “Portraiture, naturally” – got that one from a video of British photographer David Thorpe on Youtube. David is a very interesting photographer, and both his Youtube channel as well as his blog are very worthy of having a look and read. Like us, he has discovered the Micro Four Thirds system as pretty much ideal for his needs, and this after a life-long career as a photojournalist. I’m always glad when I discover people like him, and some of his writings are just so funny – take for instance his description of a “gentleman” from his article about “The Gentleman’s Lens“:

“The gentleman has always held an emblematic status in England. A gentleman is good at what he does but not superb. That would involve too much effort, which is ungentlemanly. A gentleman is superior but without effort. Effort would imply that he is concerned about what others think. That would be pandering and decidedly ungentlemanly. The essence of a gentleman is summed up by the old English aristocracy’s mode of dress. For example, an expensive, but not too expensive jacket which has been allowed to become a bit ratty, with leather patches on the elbows and frayed – but not too frayed – lapels. The message of the jacket is that the wearer has enough money but not too much (vulgar!), though almost certainly more than you because he allows a good quality jacket to become scruffy whereas you, not being a gentleman, would probably have had it repaired or – horror! – bought a new one. The message is that so superior are you that you do not even deign to compete.”

Time- and priceless, just as his discovery why gorgeous women in glamorous bars never give him a second look (that’s in another of his articles, but I’ll leave that discovery for yourself). The man surely can make you laugh. And he has world-class photos.

Ok, enough for now. As always, thanks for reading.

Some old photos

Here are some photos from a time when I was around age 4 to 7 (or so) – which is now more than 50 years ago. Obviously these were *not* taken by me… 😉

Brueder

Brüder

Leutasch

Leutasch

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Ulla, Hildegard, Willi & Wolfgang

WolfgangEinschulung

Einschulung

Thanks for viewing.

Nobuyuki Kobayashi

You should have about half an hour to watch Nobuyuki Kobayashi’s “Portrait of Nature – Myriads of Gods on Platinum Palladium Prints” on Vimeo – it’s so totally worth it. Or, “yübi”, as he calls it.

This guy’s work goes far beyond what I’ll ever be able to reach and achieve, photographically.

Oh, and it helps if you understand Japanese. But you don’t have to – the video has English subtitles.

Found via Film’s not dead.

So enlarge that on your monitor, lean back, and enjoy…