A present from my wife

My old and trusty (read: slow, but so far reliable) CD / DVD burner didn’t wanna work anymore since a while – it denied to read in any new media I tried on it. Simply gave up. So I looked for a replacement, put some found device onto my Amazon wish list, and forgot about it.

And when I came home from work yesterday, there it was – a brand new drive, waiting to be assembled.

This is what I did, but I had to open the computer case twice: the old one was ATAPI, the new one SATA, and I knew we had cables somewhere; just couldn’t find them. And after cleaning my PC a bit with a vacuum cleaner, I also took some pictures of course. Here are one from its inside, and one of the new and shiny (black) CD / DVD drive:

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PC. Olympus E-PL5 with PanaLeica 25mm/1.4 lens. Studio strobe with gridded beauty dish.

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LG DVD burner (and a card reader). Olympus E-PL5 with PanaLeica 25mm/1.4 lens. Yongnuo YN-460II compact flash bounced over a wall.

The best thing about it? The experience with the operating system. Did I mention that I just love Linux, and Debian in particular? Except making the device known to the machine’s BIOS (and selecting the boot order), it meant no configuration at all – no fumbling around with drivers, no operating system config changes, nothing at all, everything went unnoticed by the user. Much easier than with any other “user friendly” operating systems I know. It’s in fact the way it should be.

Oh, and because I could finally disable the legacy IDE chip in the BIOS, the machine even boots a bit faster now. Perfect.

Thanks for reading.

How cool is that?

If you are a regular reader of this blog, you’ll know that we have a new stereo system since a while. I started with speakers, knowing pretty well what I wanted, and lately we also added a new receiver to drive them. It’s a network receiver, but I didn’t connect and configure its network yet – no free port on our router, and because I didn’t want to buy an additional WLAN adapter and block the receiver’s only USB port with it, there’s no network yet. Or so I thought.

Today I remembered that our TV set does in fact have network, wireless even. So on my Debian PC I installed minidlna and configured it quick & dirty like described in Linux Magazine. Then I started both the TV and the receiver, et voilà:

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Network via TV

And that minidlna server is so slim and cool that I could even start a virtual Windows7 image which takes away half of my 8GB main memory to work on this photo, and later use RawTherapee on it, and then upload it to Flickr – all without the slightest hiccup or interruption of the music playing.

Now if that isn’t cool I don’t know what is. No more fumbling around with my small USB stick sneakernet-style…

Thanks for reading.