Auf Deutsch: Workshop – Die komplette DAW fürs Mini-Budget – aktualisiert für 2017

Im deutschsprachigen Musiker Board hat der User @mk1967 – ein wohl professioneller Radiomacher aus Krefeld – einen wie ich finde ganz hervorragenden Workshop bezüglich Tonstudio in Linux veröffentlicht. Den hab ich auch im ebenfalls deutschsprachigen Recording.de Forum hier weiter verlinkt.

Also für Alle die des Deutschen mächtig sind und die sich für eine quasi kostenlose Aufnahmemöglichkeit mit dem eigenen Computer interessieren – absolut lesenswert!

Danke für’s Lesen.

Vulfpeck

I was looking up some things in the forums, and also some of the test sites for musicians, so I first stumbled upon Vulfpeck (“Mit Peck”, like they called their first album) here on the German-speaking Bonedo site. And wow, indeed their bass player Joe Dart really is “Beastly” (the opening track of their first album “Mit Peck”)!

Here’s one track from their latest album “The beautiful game” – this one is called “Aunt Leslie”:

And here’s another one, called “Dean Town”:

But if you want to see (and hear) Joe, look at this:

If you want to hear more, then almost everything is available on Youtube – just look at their website for more information. If you want to buy something, they’re on bandcamp as well; two of their tracks (including the quite impressive “Beastly”) are even available as multitrack records if you want to mix and/or play along yourself – cool! Also look on their Youtube channel which has some quite funny and interesting things as well.

This is some very professionally played 60s and 70s soul & funk, and these guys groove like hell, tho they weren’t even born yet during the time of their musical style. So if Snarky Puppy is a bit too demanding, maybe this is easier to digest (and to dance to; can hardly keep my feet still when listening to this).

Meanwhile, I’m practising playing my bass ( a picture of which has been in my last blog post). And I’m also learning some cool new (and free and open source) stuff, like for instance rakarrack. Having a wonderful time.

Thanks for reading.

A picture of my newest toy

I finally took a photo of my new bass guitar, in its case which arrived two days ago (they didn’t have it in the store, so I had to order that online). Here it is:

7e1_7156758-my-bass-guitar

Squier (by Fender) VM Precision Bass Fretless

Ok; now I’m going to use it again on the collaboration I mentioned in my last blog post.

Thanks for viewing & reading.

Collaboration: jam112, by jonetsu / nominal6

Here’s a very nice ambient piece by nominal6 (on Soundcloud) / jonetsu (on LinuxMusicians):

In this LinuxMusicians forum entry, jonetsu asked for a collaboration on it, so I played the original bass line on my fretless, and gave it back via dropbox.

And since it’s under a Creative Commons Licence, I can share the result here as well:

Glad to be a working bass player again. This is fun. Here’s a screenshot from our virtual jam session (only my desktop, but you’ll get the idea):

Thanks for reading, and for listening.

Update, from Sunday 2:34 (am) local time:

I’ve updated my contribution with a newer file. It’s work-in-progress, as the piece is far from being ready. Just ideas collecting as far as I can see… anyway, still thanks for reading, and for listening.

Recommended: Scott’s Bass Lessons

From time to time I unsubscribe from all Youtube channels (except my wife’s of course). But now that I bought a bass, I re-subscribed to Scott Devine, who can be found here:

https://www.youtube.com/user/devinebass
http://www.scottsbasslessons.com/

Here’s an interview with him:

http://bassmusicianmagazine.com/2015/06/scott-devine-using-his-bass-superpowers-for-good-bass-musician-magazine-june-2015-issue/

Thinking of also joining his academy for 14$/month – that’s way cheaper than any real music school, and after my 35-year- (or so) hiatus, I probably need something like proper training.

Here’s the first freebie of his which I found interesting enough:

So I went and subscribed to his website for free, and downloaded the backing track to that lesson. It came as an .mp3 file recorded with a sample rate of 44.1kHz, so I had to convert it (using Audacity) to 48kHz and a .wav file to have Ardour accept it with my current settings.

Then I followed his advice about first playing root notes (and fifths) only – still made some “errors” (like playing the 6 on a 5 chord, or an ‘a’ instead of a ‘g’), but it’s still fun to have a nicely played II-V-I chord progression. Will keep my busy for some time, until my fingers get used to the quite high string tension of those Fender® USA Bass 7250ML, NPS, (.045-.100 Gauges) roundwound strings (as listed on the instrument’s page).

So here’s my first attempt on it:

Oh, and to another problem I’ve had until a few minutes ago:

Couldn’t upload .ogg files, or .wav, the only file type which worked in the past was .mp3. Which seemed a bit strange for a free software package like WordPress, because if one of these formats isn’t a “free” one, then it’s .mp3. So I searched around for the error message on their site, and found this new plugin which isn’t integrated yet into the current 4.8 version of WordPress. “Lord of the Files: Enhanced Upload Security“, what a cool name! Of course I thanked the developers, and gave proper feedback (which is the least I could do)…

Anyway. As always, thanks for reading, viewing, and/or listening!

apt vs. apt-get for beginners

Lately, in a music-related forum (recording.de) there was a discussion (again) on whether Linux is/could be a valid choice for recording, and for making music. One of the commenters – a strong proponent of using Windows and paid commercial software DAWs (digital audio workstations) – said:

“Command line? My god, we’re living in the 21st century!”

– or something along that, don’t recall his actual words. And these actual words don’t matter that much, since I’ve heard them so often.

No, you *don’t need to* use the command line when using Linux anymore these days. For installing software, you can use the fine available tools like synaptic et al – but sometimes, the command line is much faster than to click around with your mouse. And where Windows users are forced to first search the interweb for software they want to get, at least we people using Linux have it much and far better and easier with the repositories provided by the distributors of our fine software.

Which brings me back (sorry for the short rant) to apt vs. apt-get. apt is newer, but why should you use it? Found this nice explanation targeted to beginner-like questions like that one:

https://itsfoss.com/apt-vs-apt-get-difference/

I’m mostly using apt since a while, but still I found some things in there I simply didn’t know (using apt-cache search or apt-cache show until now). I consider myself almost a Linux veteran by now, but I don’t dig that deep into it like I used to – so I’m still reading articles like these. Nice to know, that’s all.

Anyway – I found this useful, so I wanted to share it here. Enjoy reading it, if you’re interested in Debian- and Ubuntu-based command lines.

That James Jamerson sound…

Like Zuleikha, I’m on summer holiday leave right now, which is cool – we all have some time for ourselves, and to do things we love to do.

So let me tell you a story.

When I was younger – in fact, much younger than today – I used to be a bass player. Like most other bass players, I came to that instrument via playing guitar first. Like Pink Floyd sang:

“You bought a guitar to punish your ma…”

And when I met some other bands whose guitar players were far better than me, but who needed a bass player, I took the jobs.

With 19, I was in the studios for the first time – at EMI Electrola in Cologne for instance. There I learned to really play a nice and tight line, and how noisy my Ibanez Jazz Bass was (all single coil pickups until today are) – so I also got a Music Man Sabre Bass, and an Ampeg SVT rig (300 all-valve Watts, two 8×10″ cabinets the size of big fridges (but way heavier)), all that. I was pretty much set, and ready to be a musician.

Except I didn’t earn any money. Plus I didn’t even have a driver’s license and/or a car to transport my gear. So I was dependent on other band members.

Then my Music Man Bass got stolen.

Then – realizing that we just didn’t have gigs like Deep Purple did – I sold my Ampeg and the cabinets, which left me with the Ibanez and a 15″ 130W (or so) Peavey combo.

Later I also left these behind, so I was pretty much a former musician. All I had until yesterday was a cheap “Eterna” (made for Yamaha in Indonesia) classical concert guitar, and an egg shaker. You see that guitar two posts below, and hear it one post below.

But since a year or two, I totally rediscovered my love for music. It’s through Zuleikha who plays piano, horn, and recorder, one of her classmates who is just brilliant on the recorder, her school who has a really nice big band and also the one in which Zuleikha plays (they call themselves “Brass & Co”), and also through some other people I know from my time with the Debian guys (and girls, I mean Debian developers).

One pointed me to a Korean singer named Youn Sun Nah, and I also stumbled upon Snarky Puppy lately – which is lead by a bass player.

So I also listened to lots of good bass players again, starting with the idols of my youth like Stanley Clarke or Jaco Pastorius, and also some which I heard much later, like Marcus Miller or Victor Wooten, to just name a few.

But what I also discovered was that tho the slap technique of a Marcus Miller is still great, it’s not what the bass was originally invented for. Long before that funky slap style, a bass was just a great and important part of the rhythm section, more or less carrying the whole music, and making people dance and swing and tap their feet – you probably know what I mean. So my “idol” picture shifted a bit again, to people like Pino Palladino – and to one of the first and greatest players of electric basses, James Jamerson (wow, got the curve to the headline after some 550 words or so).

You probably never heard that name, but James Jamerson (EN, DE) together with his band which was called “The Funk Brothers” (EN, DE) were the basis of almost everything Motown. Let me cite from that English Wikipedia article about them:

“The role of the Funk Brothers is described in Paul Justman’s 2002 documentary film Standing in the Shadows of Motown, based on Allan Slutsky’s book of the same name. The opening titles claim that the Funk Brothers have “played on more number-one hits than the Beatles, Elvis Presley, the Rolling Stones and the Beach Boys combined.”[1]”

Together with James, a new kind of bass was rising. It was invented short before 1960 by Leo Fender, and he called it the “Precision Bass” (EN, DE). The name was chosen because other than an upright double bass, it had frets, so “you could play it with precision”, which probably also helped in selling it.

During my journey through the videos on Youtube I soon found out about the differences of a P-Bass, like it is also called, and others like my former J-Bass copy. Professional studio musicians like Scott Devine will tell you that you need both P- and J-Basses, while others like Michael League from Snarky Puppy (and Forq and other bands of his) simply play it – and it sounds way better, deeper, with much more “growl” than, say, the slapped Fender or Sire basses from Marcus Miller.

So yesterday (it’s way past midnight while writing this) I’ve got one, after comparing it to some J-Bass myself.

Zuleikha helped with some add-ons and found a really nice (and not too expensive) strap, and even reminded me to get a stand for it (and that was a good idea, that stand also fits the guitar, and even her horn).

But…

Other than Leo Fender marketed it, I’ve chosen a fretless one. Always, always wanted a fretless bass, and you should have seen Zuleikha’s astonished smile when she tested it herself (over a Sadowsky 200W all-valve amp in the store)! My god, these things can sing; it’s unbelievable. But to that aspect: later, in another post. For now, let’s just keep in mind that I’ll have to take care of that “precision” myself; cannot rely on frets because there aren’t any 😉

First thing I thought about when we were back home was what to teach Zuleikha in case she’d ask. And again some song on which James Jamerson played the bass came to my mind – probably the song with the simplest and one of the best known bass lines ever: Papa was a rolling stone, by the Temptations.

I had that as a MIDI file laying around on my hard drive, and started playing to it on my computer. But soon enough, I disliked that MIDI file, so I went for the original. Which I don’t have in our bookshelf, so I downloaded it from Youtube (search for “papa was a rolling stone temptations” (without the quotes), it’s the first one which was shown in my search result).

So what did I do? Well the bass line consists of exactly 3 notes (and the whole song on just one chord, can you believe it?) – so I put the song in a stereo track in Ardour, and played the same into a mono track using my own new bass guitar. Then I analysed the notes (Bb, Ab, Db) and their frequencies and took them out of the original a bit, replacing them with my own ones which I played. If you look at those two equalizers used for the tracks, it looked like this:

Screenshot from 2017-07-11 00-04-25

(Some short technical explanation: I was a bit afraid to also totally take out the kick (bass) drum while doing this, because I didn’t want to make the filters’ “Q Factor” to steep – which would add distortion. But switching between “bypass” and “filter on” that kick drum still sat pretty good in the mix – which means that it’s a great recording, even if it’s from 1972. Oh, and that source was from vinyl, you can hear the cracks on the LP, which gives it another vintage vibe. So except from Youtube digitising the original, and my interface digitising the bass, what you hear here is pretty much analog. Still cool – or maybe even because it is…)

Then I exported the result as a .wav file with the usual restriction to -23LUFS, which looks like this:

Screenshot from 2017-07-11 00-21-28

It’s all Ardour and some Calf plugins, and the bass was plugged directly into my Focusrite audio interface, so no amp was used at all. And like James did, I played it with just one finger of my right hand (but didn’t use my index finger but the thumb to make it sound deeper).

The result, again converted into an MP3 file? Here:

Oh, and in case you want to see the bass I’ve got – haven’t made pictures of it yet, so here’s one from the maker:

Click on that photo if you want to read more about it.

For now, thanks for reading, watching, and listening. More later.

Blues in C minor 7

A nightly idea gathering / recording, which I also used for this thread on the German-speaking recording.de forum:

ardour-calf-desktop from Wolfgang Lonien on Vimeo.

Played on the guitar you can see in my last post, I used this video for demonstration purposes.

It shows that you can record music with Linux, and free and open source software.

Gear used:

  • Yamaha Eterna classical guitar
  • Røde NT-1a microphone
  • Focusrite Scarlett 6i6 2nd gen. audio interface
  • Debian Linux 9 “Stretch”
  • KXStudio repositories
  • Ardour 5.10 digital audio workstation
  • some of the Calf plugins
  • simplescreenrecorder

The video is in FullHD on Vimeo.

Oh, and the music builds on “Footprints” from Wayne Shorter – same chords and 3/4 structure used.

Thanks for viewing.